Archive for April, 2016

Mourn with those who mourn. Rom 12 v 15

by Colin Dexter

Life is not about comfort – suffering is part of our Christian life. Hearing stories of persecuted believers encourage us to pray and addresses our individualism. It gives us a heavenly perspective on our own lives that we can lose easily.  Anne Coles    (Release may-june 16)

by Colin Dexter

24.4.16

by Colin Dexter

Notices 17.4.16 (2)

Famous Quotes

by Colin Dexter

Although we are capable of great acts of kindness, history teaches us that we sometimes need saving from ourselves – from our recklessness or our greed. God sent into the world a unique person – neither a philosopher nor a general (important though they are) – but a Saviour, with the power to forgive.’ (2011)  HRH QE 11

by Colin Dexter

Deaf Coffee Morning

by Colin Dexter

CAP Debt

Core Values

by Colin Dexter

We have adopted the  5 core values of Cell Church

These can be described in different ways, but essentially they are:

  • Jesus at the centre/Love God
  • Church is community/Love one another
  • Every member in ministry/Use your gifts to serve others
  • Every member growing/Being transformed into his likeness
  • Every member making disciples/I will make you fishers of men

An Apple a day

by Colin Dexter

So now we know. Normally adults gain one or two kilos every four years in middle age, but you don’t need fad diets to beat middle age spread. Just eat a handful of grapes a few times a week. Add berries, apples or cherries and plenty of vegetables. Keep the habit over two decades and in every probability you won’t add to your waist line- maybe even get slimmer. These are the findings of three massive 24yr US studies involving 124,00 people. An elaborate research project showing what common sense probably knew all along.

Independent. 29th Jan 2016 ind.pn/1nV62TO

Via CMF . “Triple Helix  Spring 2016”

Transforming Prayer

by Colin Dexter

“At the heart of our prayers will be words that Jesus himself taught us – ‘Thy kingdom come, thy will be done.’ It is impossible to overstate the life-transforming power of the Lord’s Prayer. It is a prayer that is reassuring enough to be on the lips of the dying and yet dangerous enough to be banned in cinemas. It is famous enough to be spoken each day by billions in hundreds of languages and yet intimate enough to draw us ever closer into friendship with Jesus Christ. It is simple enough to be memorised by small children and yet profound enough to sustain a whole lifetime of prayer. When we pray it with sincerity and with joy, there is no imagining the new ways in which God can use us to his glory.”

A PERSONAL STATEMENT FROM THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY JUSTIN WELBY

by Colin Dexter

In the last month I have discovered that my biological father is not Gavin Welby but, in fact, the late Sir Anthony Montague Browne.

This comes as a complete surprise.

My mother (Jane Williams) and father (Gavin Welby) were both alcoholics. My mother has been in recovery since 1968, and has not touched alcohol for over 48 years. I am enormously proud of her.

My father (Gavin Welby) died as a result of the alcohol and smoking in 1977 when I was 21.

As a result of my parents’ addictions my early life was messy, although I had the blessing and gift of a wonderful education, and was cared for deeply by my grandmother, my mother once she was in recovery, and my father (Gavin Welby) as far as he was able.

I have had a life of great blessing and wonderful support, especially from Caroline and our children, as well as a great many wonderful friends and family.

My own experience is typical of many people. To find that one’s father is other than imagined is not unusual. To be the child of families with great difficulties in relationships, with substance abuse or other matters, is far too normal.

By the grace of God, found in Christian faith, through the NHS, through Alcoholics Anonymous and through her own very remarkable determination and effort, my mother has lived free of alcohol, has a very happy marriage, and has contributed greatly to society as a probation officer, member of the National Parole Board, Prison Visitor and with involvement in penal reform.

She has also played a wonderful part in my life and in the lives of my children and now grandchildren, as has my stepfather whose support and encouragement has been generous, unstinting and unfailing.

This revelation has, of course, been a surprise, but in my life and in our marriage Caroline and I have had far worse. I know that I find who I am in Jesus Christ, not in genetics, and my identity in him never changes. Even more importantly my role as Archbishop makes me constantly aware of the real and genuine pain and suffering of many around the world, which should be the main focus of our prayers.

Although there are elements of sadness, and even tragedy in my father’s (Gavin Welby’s) case, this is a story of redemption and hope from a place of tumultuous difficulty and near despair in several lives. It is a testimony to the grace and power of Christ to liberate and redeem us, grace and power which is offered to every human being.

At the very outset of my inauguration service three years ago, Evangeline Kanagasooriam, a young member of the Canterbury Cathedral congregation, said: “We greet you in the name of Christ. Who are you, and why do you request entry?” To which I responded: “I am Justin, a servant of Jesus Christ, and I come as one seeking the grace of God to travel with you in His service together.” What has changed? Nothing!

http://www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/…/a-personal-statemen